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Wednesday, November 26, 2014

Ireland, Water, Government, Privatization, Tax

THIS IS INDEPENDENT CLARE DALY OF IRELAND SPEAKING OUT AGAINST THE CHARGES ON THE WATER IN IRELAND.  WE ALL KNOW THAT THE METERS WERE PUT ON THE WATER LINES BEFORE THE PRIVATIZATION, OR SHOULD I SAY PIRATIZATION.


 
CLARE DALY SAYS THAT THE GOVERNMENT HAS LOST THE WILL OF THE PEOPLE, WHICH IS NOT UNLIKE THE GOVERNMENT IN THIS COUNTRY.

 

Tuesday, November 25, 2014

HEAR WHAT THE REAL FREEWAY RICKY ROSS SAYS ABOUT GANGSTA RAP, AND DRUGS

LEONARD HAS BEEN IN PRISON FOR 40 YEARS FOR A CRIME THAT HE DID NOT COMMIT.  THE TRIAL WAS RIGGED.  HE WAS PUT THEIR AS A RESULT OF COINTELPRO, WHICH WAS AN UNCONSTITUTIONAL PROGRAM RUN BY THE FBI.

Monday, November 24, 2014


Observations on President Putin’s call upon US not to meddle in Russia affairs

By Peter Koenig

November 24, 2014 "
ICH" - Press TV reports on 22 November 2014 that President Putin, speaking at a forum of the All-Russia Peoples' Front in Moscow on 17 November, said “They [the US] want to subdue us, want to solve their problems at our expense. No one in history ever managed to do this to Russia, and no one ever will.”

This is certainly no exaggeration. Russia has not only a solid trade and monetary alliance with China which already today bypasses the western dollar dominated western system, Russia is also one of the key members of the BRICS and the Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO) which met last September in Dushanbe, Tajikistan to expands its current membership (China, Russia, Kazakhstan, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan) by including India, Pakistan, Iran and likely also Mongolia. Turkey, hosting a strategically crucial NATO base, wavering between east and west, has wanted to become an SCO member for quite a while. Turkish-speaking SCO governments would likely to support their petition. This would clearly be a huge conflict and blow to the western powers, particularly Washington – and may not go ‘unpunished’.

The expanded SCO would control some 20 percent of the world’s oil and half of all global gas reserves. On top of that, the bloc would represent about half of the world’s population. The SCO and BRICS together would cover more than half the world’s population and control about a third of the globe’s GDP.

The issuance of a joint new global currency either by these countries at once or step by step is almost a certainty. The question is when. Given the disastrous course of western economies, such a new currency and monetary system is not far off. It would gradually replace the (petro) dollar for world trading as well as a reserve currency. The latter has already started. Ten years ago about 90% of world reserves consisted of dollar denominated securities. Today this proportion has shrunk to 60% - and – to the ignorance of most of the world – is steadily declining.

According to the IMF, reserves in other currencies in emerging markets have shot up by 400% since 2003. From August 2013 to February 2014, South Korea increased its yuan holdings 25-fold.

So – Mr. Putin’s seemingly ‘bold’ statement is very much supported by facts. The western predatory economic system is decaying fast. Russia and China are already today prepared with an alternative. They are working actively with the other BRICS and SCO countries to prepare a solid larger scale alternative currency and monetary system, free from the FED, Wall Street, the IMF and the BIS (Bank for International Settlements).

----------

Epidemics and Pandemics

On a seemingly unrelated matter, a new phenomenon is emerging. From the outset it looks like detached from the east-west economic power struggle. But it may be all but detached from the western faltering economy.

It is the threat of deadly pandemics that seem to emerge at the same time – and all are under control of the UN and its specialized organization, WHO which is assisted and advised by a number of international laboratories whose identifications largely escapes common knowledge. Most of the epidemics, potential pandemics, started in Africa, which is home to about 60% of the world’s remaining natural unrenewable resources – and which are sought by the western and Northern Hemisphere’s elite for their continued comfort and well-being.

Ebola broke out a few months ago in West Africa – Liberia, Sierra Leone, Guinea and has since spread to Mali and Nigeria. Ebola is not a new disease. It has been reported and observed in Central Africa and former Zaïre in the seventies. WHO disposes of antidotes or vaccines. However, the US Department of Defense – which incidentally also has a research program on biological warfare – has contracted a Canadian laboratory two years ago to test and develop an Ebola vaccine in specially built hospitals in Liberia and Sierra Leone. Since the new Ebola outbreak in July 2014, more than 5,000 people have been killed according to WHO.

A couple of days ago it was reported by WHO that in Madagascar a plague epidemic had claimed the lives of at least 40 people since August 2014. – The bubonic plague, also called Black Death, was considered to be basically extinct since it killed a third of the European population in the 14ht Century, although a less virulent form may still be present today. No major outbreaks have occurred since 1904, when a Plague epidemic killed about 3% of Bombay’s population, when antidotes where not yet available. Today’s version can apparently fairly easily be suppressed with antibiotics and pesticides. – So – why is it still killing people in Madagascar? And why has the news become available only now?

A few weeks ago the deadly H5N1 avian influenza virus was newly discovered in the Netherlands, Germany and the UK. Out of seven recent cases of Bird Flu in Egypt, two died. In 2009 thanks to a WHO false flag alarm, Europe bought hundreds of millions of H5N1 vaccines – a bonanza for the pharmaceuticals – a scandal for WHO that has deeply tarnished the organization’s image. In countries like Switzerland, people who showed any indication of a cold were practically force-vaccinated.

Aids – the HIV virus, also a Pentagon biological warfare experiment –broke out in the 1980’s, likewise in Africa, spread to Haiti from where it was ‘imported’ to the US and the rest of the world. Today it is, though incurable, under control. But a new strain could easily be designed to make current drugs impotent.

All of this looks like a concerted effort by the power elite to (i) keep populations in check; justify Marshall law at a whim to oppress any potential uprising, for example against a new wave of organized theft of the western predatory greed economy; and (ii) to gradually help reduce world population – a target that the elite has strived for since the end of WWII – it’s also one of the key objectives of the Bilderberg Society as voiced by many power figures, like Bill Gates and on several occasions by Henry Kissinger, arguably the worst war criminal still alive.

People could be easily quarantined by Presidential Executive Order under the guise of protecting the population at large from a pandemic – for which most likely vaccines and antidotes have been clandestinely developed as part of the biological warfare program – to protect the elite – and other strains for the public at large possibly laced with the very disease they pretend to prevent. Once Washington gives the order, say for force-vaccination, or Marshall Law – the European lackeys would simply follow suit; an easy way to keep populations under control, while the western financial system could run their final deed – depredation of the remaining social safety nets and public savings.

Again – on the dismal western economic scenario and the pandemic threats to the world, Mr. Putin’s harsh words to the US, a warning against interference in Russia – are but a signal for Washington to reckon with a vigilant Russia (and China) – vigilant vis-à-vis the impending collapse of the western monetary system, and vigilant vis-à-vis the west’s massive military and biological warfare threats.

Worth a thought? – And worth massive publication, so people may connect the dots.

Peter Koenig is an economist and geopolitical analyst. He is also a former World Bank staff and worked extensively around the world in the fields of environment and water resources. He is the author of Implosion – An Economic Thriller about War, Environmental Destruction and Corporate Greed – fiction based on facts and on 30 years of World Bank experience around the globe.

 

THANK YOU INFORMATIONCLEARINGHOUSE.INFO


 The World Economy

A Longer View
 
by Wayne Daniels

November 2014

 

Here are a few observations on where the world's economies are and where they are likely to evolve over the next several years.

 

Lets see where they are now:  

Japan is officially in a recession and has announced a major new round of QE to continue for months, if not years.  Japanese interest rates will stay at zero for the foreseeable future.  Both demographics and the size of their national debt will prevent any meaningful improvement in the Japanese economy during, at least, the next 5 years.

 

The European economies continue to be stuck in neutral and will likely follow France into recession.  Most everyone (except Germany) has a national debt that exceeds GDP and must run deficits in order to pay the promised benefits to their voters.  European exports, mostly German, will continue to slow as demand worldwide continues to decline. It is quite likely that some event will trigger another financial crisis which will result in at least one and maybe more of these countries following Greece into bankruptcy: Italy, Spain, Portugal and/or France.

 

The Chinese economy is also slowing from the reported 10% per year rate of the last 20+ years to something in the mid single digit range. (Apply your own adjustment factor to bring the reported numbers closer to reality.)  In any case, their economy is trying to make the transition from being the low cost place to assemble items designed elsewhere to becoming a value added producer of items they design.  At best that transition will take a decade or so as will the transition to selling much of the stuff they produce in their domestic market.  There is ample opportunity for things to go wrong and neither transition is likely to be smooth.

 

The US economic recovery continues driven both by the massive QE over the past 6 years and the oil and gas boom.  US exports (15% of GDP) will slow along with the worldwide demand for goods and services.  The FED has officially ended QE and the 30% decline in the price of crude oil will slow new oil and gas drilling.  It is not clear where the incremental future growth will come from.  How will the US economy continue to grow while Europe, Japan, China and most of the developing world are not?

 

Where does the world go from here?

The USA, Japan and just about every other major democracy has a debt problem. All are now reaching the natural limit of Keynesism (borrow & spend to keep the economy moving) – its called bankruptcy.  When the national debt is greater than GDP, there is little to no chance that the debt will ever be paid down much less paid off. 

 

When the FED announced the end of QE in September, they also said that short term interest rates would continue to be held at or near zero percent.  The only way to hold interest rates below the inflation rate is for the FED to be the buyer of last resort and buy any T-Bills, etc. that the market is not willing to take.  Since about half of our $17 trillion national debt has a maturity of less than 1 year, that means that the US Treasury has to refinance an average of $0.7 trillion/month plus sell an additional $0.05 trillion in new debt each month. 

 

If the FED is unable, or unwilling, to keep expanding its balance sheet by buying more T-Bills, etc. (also known as QE) then the only way for the US Treasury to sell these bonds is to let the markets find a price/yield where the markets will clear.  The average interest rate on that $17 trillion of debt is currently ~ 1%.  Interest on the national debt is ~ 6% of the federal budget.  If the average interest rate on the debt went back to the historical norm – from 1950 to 1990 it was the inflation rate plus 1% to 2% - then the interest paid percentage of the federal budget would jump to around 20% of the budget.  That is the entire discretionary spending portion of the budget and no politician in need of re-election can afford to let that happen.

 

The hard choices are: Cut spending – hard because every dollar in the budget has a constituency, Raise taxes – hard because, as the Japanese just learned, a big tax increase can throw the economy into a recession.  The easier choice is to continue QE and simply cover the deficit with the printing press.  This choice eventually leads to a period of hyper inflation and the currency becoming worthless.  So far the US has avoided the inflation (ignoring supermarket prices) and the dollar has actually strengthened this year.  The USA seems to be the “least sick man” in the room at the moment.

 

Another expensive problem continues to be radical Islam.  The 10,000+ Wahhabi madrassas worldwide continue to turn out about half million 18 year old would be jihadies each year.  ISIS and other such organizations have recently become much more effective in converting all of that youthful energy into very expensive problems for the rest of the world.  One recent news story put the cost of the current air campaign against ISIS in Syria and Iraq at $300,000 per hour.  This cost is likely to go much higher if, as I expect, our current involvement escalates into Gulf War.

 

I have long been a believer in the “Muddle Through” theory of governance.  While our so called leaders rarely seem to know what they are doing, the country has found a way to get through what ever the problem(s) of the day were and wake up the next day to face other challenges.  I do not claim to know either how or why it has worked, but it has.  Maybe we have just been lucky.

 

An example of “Muddle Through” is how the oil and gas boom in the US is breaking our almost century old dependence on Middle East (primarily Saudi) oil.  Despite the best efforts of the environmental lobby and their friends in the main stream media and the Democratic party, the US has managed to bring enough new production online to drive the world price of crude oil down some 30%.  The new jobs, etc. have been great for the domestic economy and the resulting lower fuel prices are the equivalent of a big tax cut for consumers.  In addition, lower crude prices are creating problems for several countries that wish us harm.  The most vulnerable seems to be Venezuela followed by Russia, Iran and the various smaller middle eastern producers.  The longer the price of crude stays below $75/barrel, the more severe the economic problems in those countries will become.

 

Other examples are how our country has survived the more or less regular business cycles that have occurred over the past century.  Regardless of what the politicians have done or not done, the country has always muddled through.

 

I would like to think the USA and the other major democracies will find a way to “Muddle Through” their debt problem(s).  I do not see how they can, but that probably says more about me than it does about the intractability of the problem. 

 

Thomas Piketty, the French economist who works on wealth and income inequality, has documented that the income inequality gap widened from 1800 to 1914, shrank from 1914 to   ~ 1975 and has been getting wider ever since.  Here is my theory why that happened: the period from 1800 until the start of WWI was the golden age of the Industrial Revolution which created vast amounts of wealth.  Much of that wealth flowed to the leaders of the major industries – steel, oil, railroads, autos, etc.  The press labeled those wealthy industry leaders the Robber Barons.  Much of that wealth was destroyed in two world wars and the great depression and the spread narrowed. The 1950s and 1960s saw the rise of the middle class due at least in part to improved education resulting from programs like the GI Bill.  The Information Revolution began in the mid 1970s with the introduction of the personal computer.  The information revolution has also created vast new pools of wealth which has mostly flowed to the leaders of the new industries like software, semiconductors, etc.  Since 1980 the real (inflation adjusted) wages of everyone else have been approximately flat.

 

My fearless forecast for the next decade = little to no growth worldwide as Europe, Japan and the USA will all be constrained by their debt problems.  The Information Revolution will continue to produce very useful gadgets (like the smart phone) which will give just about everyone access to the world's store of knowledge.  Don't be surprised if a lot of people figure out how to use that knowledge to improve their lives.  The most important skill may turn out to be knowing how to ask Google the right question to get the information you need. There is real upside to that.

 

On the downside, the ongoing wars between radical Islam and the rest of the world will cause both sides to waste a great deal of their accumulated wealth.
 
Not necessarily the views of the blog, but the views of the author.

Sunday, November 23, 2014

AGAIN THE SO-CALLED REPRESENTATIVE OF THE PEOPLE ARE NOT ACTING IN THE BEST INTERESTS OF THE PEOPLE.  WHO ARE THEY ACTING FOR?

WELL ONE OF THE SPONSORS OF THE BILL IS STATE SENATOR PAUL SARLO, WHO JUST HAPPENS TO BE THE COO OF SANZARI CONSTRUCTION.

IT IS A WEB OF THEIVES IN TRENTON.  IT MAKES NOT DIFFERENCE IF IT IS A (D) OR AN (R) THAT APPERARS AFTER THEIR NAME.

Privatization of public water, sewer systems could be fast-tracked under N.J. bill

EX0115WATER

The backwash pumps at the Newark Watershed facility in West Milford are shown in this 2012 file photo. Such publicly-owned water systems could be sold to private companies without a referendum, under a bill pending before the state senate. (Star-Ledger file photo)


Seth Augenstein | NJ Advance Media for NJ.com By Seth Augenstein | NJ Advance Media for NJ.comThe Star-Ledger
Email the author | Follow on Twitter
on November 06, 2014 at 7:35 AM, updated
November 06, 2014 at 8:43 AM


Trenton voters were given the opportunity to sell the city’s water system to a private company in 2010. The $80 million sale was defeated in a 4-to-1 landslide.

At Tuesday’s polls, hundreds of voters in tiny Sussex Borough overwhelmingly rejected a similar sale of their public system to private hands, while Haddonfield in Camden County solidly approved selling its deteriorating system to New Jersey American Water.

But such direct public mandate on water and sewer sales may become a thing of the past, as a bill in the Legislatures allowing public entities to fast-track selling water and sewer systems that serve millions advances this fall.

The sponsors of the “Water Infrastructure Protection Act” say it’s a way to get desperately-needed investment into water systems that have been neglected to the breaking point by government owners. The bill’s opponents warn that it’s an attempt to turn private profits of public infrastructure at the expense of taxpayers – who themselves will end up paying for the purchase prices with each flush of the toilet.

“The legislature should reject this transparent attempt by private water companies to fleece ratepayers while cutting the public out of important decisions about the management and ownership of their water resources,” said Jim Walsh, New Jersey Director of Food & Water Watch, a non-profit watchdog which advocates for public health.

“This bill removes important consumer protections by accelerating the sales of publicly owned systems, limiting voters involvement in the process, and forcing the Board to go along with negotiated contracts that could potentially be harmful for ratepayers,” said Stefanie Brand, the director of the state’s Division of Rate Counsel. “We urge that this bill not be voted out of committee.”

Currently, a public entity must put a potential sale directly to the public in the form of a referendum. But the bipartisan bill, sponsored by State Sen. Joe Kyrillos (R-Monmouth) and State Sen. Paul Sarlo (D-Bergen), would put together a new process by which a municipality could seek to designate its system as in disrepair – and get approvals from both the Department of Environmental Protection and the Board of Public Utilities to sell it directly to a private company.

“In its own way, it’s as important as the renewal of the Transportation Trust Fund,” said Kyrillos. “It’s a big deal for the state in terms of environmental problems, and economic growth.”

Any system within a combined-sewer overflow, being within a critical water supply area, having a potential for sodium intrusion, or being deficient in drinkability or pressure could be put up for sale, according to the bill. Kyrillos could not give an estimate of how many systems would fall into the categories, but the overflows alone are present in 21 of the biggest New Jersey cities, and the critical water areas extend in a curving arc through central and southern New Jersey, according to DEP documents.

Critics contend those categories are too broad. And it’s not just environmentalists who oppose the bill. The New Jersey State League of Municipalities has lobbied against the legislation, warning against its possible long-term effects. Bill Dressel, the executive director of the group, contends that that a water system is a local government’s “most valuable asset” – and voters should have the direct say as to whether it is sold.

“It’s at the essence of local government,” Dressel said. “The League is concerned about the authorization of a sale of a water utility asset without voter approval.”

The state’s Division of Rate Counsel, which represents ratepayers across New Jersey, blasted the bill in written testimony as the bill was voted out of the senate budget and appropriations committee in October. The cost of buying the systems will be passed on with increased rates, said Brand, the division’s director.

“This bill … has the potential to allow investor-owned utilities to run wild with bid prices in an effort to submit the highest bid,” said Brand. “Meanwhile, ratepayers will be required to pay for the full purchase price in rate, and will pay for these higher bids.

“If the utility knows in advance that the entire purchase price will be recoverable from ratepayers, it will have no incentive to submit a reasonable bid or negotiate a reasonable purchase price,’’ she added.

The bill could affect a majority of the water systems in New Jersey. Publicly-owned water systems account for 321 of the 593 community water system in the state, said Bob Considine, a spokesman for the state Department of Environmental Protection. The remaining private systems span a range from the massive United Water and New Jersey American Water systems which each serve more than half a million people, down to tiny water systems serving just a few dozen mobile homes.

An Oct. 20 legislative financial analysis of the bill cited that the federal Environmental Protection Agency estimates that New Jersey’s water, wastewater and stormwater infrastructure will need $41 billion investments over the next 20 years.

Kyrillos, the co-sponsor, counters that any sales will not happen “willy nilly” – and many other people in the Garden State already have taps and toilets supplied by private companies.

“Many, many, many people in New Jersey have private water utilities,” the senator said. “And they pay a reasonable price that’s overseen by the BPU.”

Sarlo, the other sponsor of the bill, did not return a call.

Jeff Tittel, the director of the Sierra Club’s New Jersey chapter, said the rejection of privatization efforts in Trenton in 2010 and Newark in 2012 have led to the bill to make it easier to get around public scrutiny.

“Many towns and public utilities want to privatize water and sewer services for short term financial gain which will mean long term problems for their residents,” Tittel said. “This legislation is trying to silence residents since they know the public is against these privatizations because with privatization we see higher costs, worse services, and at times threats to public health and safety.”

Seth Augenstein can be reached at saugenstein@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @SethAugenstein. Find NJ.com on Facebook.





IF YOU REALLY WANT TO KNOW WHAT THE UNCONSTITUTIONAL ACTIONS OF EL PRESEDENTE MEANS HERE IT IS

http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2014/11/20/fact-sheet-immigration-accountability-executive-action